How to Check Your New Home for Defects

How to Check Your New Home for Defects

Article first published at Renotalk.com, link: http://www.renotalk.com/articles/577/How-to-Check-Your-New-Home-for-Defects Inspecting defects in your new home can be a challenge, especially for us inexperienced homeowners. Despite our inexperience, inspecting for defects is necessary since our homes are probably the largest investments we will make in our lifetime. Before you embark on renovating your new flat, it is good practice to check your house for defects, and get the developer to rectify them for you. If this is not done, there may be a possibility that it becomes harder and costlier to rectify certain defects after the completion of your renovation works. For instance, some defects such as hollow floor tiles need to be rectified before the cabinets, shelves and wardrobes are installed on the floor. Another example is water seepage in the ceiling, which needs to be resolved before the erection of false ceilings below the bare ceiling. For a guide to defects inspection in your new home, read on! To make things easier for you, carry out your defects inspection in a systematic way. Defects are typically grouped into 7 main categories: Floors Internal Walls Ceiling Doors Windows Mechanical and Electrical (M&E) Fittings – power points, switches, air-conditioning units, taps, etc. Other Components – carpentry like wardrobes, kitchen cabinets, shoe racks, staircase railings, etc. Some common defects that you should try to check are cracks and stains on your walls/floors/fittings, chips or inconsistent joints between your tiles, staple marks, inconsistent gaps between the door leaf and door frame, misalignment of door handles, window panes, power points, and more. Fig 1. Chipped tiles     Fig 2. Blistering paint     Fig 3....
Building a solid career

Building a solid career

Article was first published at Straits Time Scholar’s Choice III. Inspired by a mentor during his industrial attachment, BCA scholar Tan Wee Kwang is determined to make an impact in the construction industry. by leong phei phei BUILDING and Construction Authority (BCA) scholarship holder Tan Wee Kwang (right) is one of the lucky few who met a person who inspired him to forge a career in the construction field during his industrial attachment. That man is his current deputy director at BCA, Engineer (Er) Lee Chee Keong. Recalling the days when he interned at BCA’s Transit Shelter Engineering Department (TSED), Mr Tan says his mentor impressed him with his leadership and professionalism. His life has come full circle in the sense that he is now officially working under Er Lee in TSED. Mr Tan says: “Knowing that my aspiration is toobtain the Professional Engineering licence, Er Lee has not only created numerous opportunities for me to be exposed to the various facets of the project cycle, but he has also personally guided me in building up my technical knowledge.   “Till today, he continues to be one of my role models in the industry, and I hope that one day I will be able to emulate his success.” In addition to being guided by an inspiring mentor, Mr Tan has been given wideranging roles in the organisation, giving him a good sense of the work that BCA does The Hwa Chong alumnus graduated in 2006 with a first class honours degree in mechanical engineering from the National University of Singapore (NUS).   He has taken on diverse portfolios ranging...
Building the future

Building the future

Article first published at JobsCentral, link http://community.jobscentral.com.sg/node/1406 The BCA is more than just about construction, as Tan Wee Kwang finds out in his role to help shape a better built environment for the future. By Joyce Lin Most people would be put off by the three “Ds” of the building and construction industry – “dirty”, “dangerous” and “demanding” – but not Tan Wee Kwang. The 28-year-old Senior Executive Engineer at the Building & Construction Authority (BCA) currently works in the Transit Shelter Engineering Department which regulates the planning, design and construction of Civil Defence MRT shelter stations in Singapore. So the next time you pass by these MRT stations, such as those in the Northeast Line and Circle Line, everything from the environmental control system to the drainage system have been certified as good to go, thanks in part to Wee Kwang’s dedication to his job. Captivated from young As a senior executive engineer, Wee Kwang is able to fulfil his childhood dream of having a role in the physical development of Singapore. “When I was young, I lived at the outskirts of the Hougang New Town and witnessed the transformation of the primary forest into the current Sengkang and Buangkok housing estates. The close proximity of my house to the actual development presented me with an invaluable opportunity to view the day-to-day operations on site, and that had formed a lasting impression in my mind as well as inspired me to join the construction industry.” Armed with this childhood dream, it was not surprising that Wee Kwang seized the opportunity to take up a scholarship with BCA after his...